Shop for clothes, accessories, swimwear and even farming kits

Like many events this year, Boutique Fairs has gone online. The popular bi-annual market, which typically holds its events at the F1 Pit Building, has launched eBoutiques, an online shopping platform. Fans of local and independent brands can now shop online anytime, anywhere 24/7.

Products range from home decor, fashion, lifestyle products and children’s toys. But one thing remains the same: you’ll still find independent, design-led, and socially responsible brands that have become the hallmark of Boutique Fairs. Here are some up-and-coming brands to check out at eBoutiques.
 

Palola
 

Ill-fitting shoes are the bane of every working woman. If you can afford it, always go for quality, well-crafted leather footwear. That was what bespoke shoemaker Josh Leong and leather artisan Jeremiah Ang had in mind when they founded the brand. You won’t find sky-high stilettos here; instead, Palola shoes are centred on style, comfort and craftsmanship.

They may be a little pricey (each pair costs between $345 and $395), but your feet will thank you. Materials used are bovine and lambskin leathers from Italy and Spain that have been sourced and manufactured in an ethical and environmentally-friendly manner. No animals were bred intentionally for the purpose of harvesting their skins to produce leather footwear products.
 


 

Mann-Oh-Mann
 

This is sustainable swimwear made from recycled plastic bottles, with a local twist. Designer and photographer Sandra Macheroux has created this Singapore-inspired range for men and children, featuring collages of photographs taken in the streets of Singapore, including old and new architecture and quirky and iconic scenes. The shorts are printed on super soft fabric produced from recycled plastic bottles using water-based ink. Plus, each pair comes in a matching reusable drawstring bag for zero waste packaging.
 


 

Indi Bindie


This boutique label is the opposite of fast fashion—think of it as resortwear with a conscience. Indi Bindie supports local craft communities with distinctive skill sets and helps empower artisans while bringing sustainable luxury to women. Each design is unique and handmade in India and Bali in limited amounts, combining age-old techniques such as block printing and batik with modern silhouettes. It can take days to make, as fabric is individually printed by hand, dried, then dipped in 100 per cent vegetable dye.
 


 

Super Farmers


Fancy growing your own veggies? The Super Farmers Urban Farming Kit is an easy way to grow kang kong, kailan and chye sim in your home. Each pot in this set of three contains a bag of organic soil, two simple-to-grow Seed Sticks and a growing guide. Your greens will be ready to harvest in just 14 days. What’s more, each kit is lovingly assembled and packed by underprivileged elderly ladies who are supported by the AMKFSC COMNET Senior Services, an agency under the Ministry of Social and Family Development. The common goal is to help vulnerable and low-income seniors to live independently and actively in the community.
 


 

GeGe Fashion


This eco-friendly and sustainable brand is the brainchild of Genevieve Joly, who wants “to create innovative and unique fashion that puts our environment and communities above all”. Bags are made from natural and upcycled materials. The Cocotte crossbody bag, for examples, is made of coconut leather (a type of vegan leather made from coconut water) under ethical conditions in a small community of South Asia.
 


 


Visit Boutique Fairs’ e-commerce store here.